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11 Things Every Dance Teacher Wishes Their Students Knew

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We asked and you answered! Here are the top 11 things dance teachers wish their students understood. Let us know if you agree with these over on our Facebook page!

Thanks for being fabulous and keeping your students' best interests at heart. We vow to love you all forever and ever! xoxo


1. "When I'm hard on you, it's only because I want you to reach your potential." —Every dance teacher ever


2. "You don't need to peak at 10 years old." —Kim DelGrosso


3. "Enjoy your studio time. Nothing will ever compare to the time growing up with your dance family." — Heather Webb Jasso


4. "Dance is an art! The art of dance is not about competition and winning awards. Competition dance provides a venue to perform and share. Once you realize that, you have to create your kind of art your own way, then you will be happy. Three judges' opinions do not define you. Dance to create something beautiful; dance to be happy; dance to leave an impression on someone's heart. Move others through your passion, love and beauty. Don't ever stop dancing because you don't think you are good enough. All dancers are good enough. Love each other, support each other and just always keep dancing!" —Kandee Allen


5. "A correction from your teacher is a GOOD thing! You want corrections from your teachers! It means they care and want to see you get better! I'm sick of hearing that kids feel picked-on because their teacher keeps giving them corrections!" —Abreá Danielle Ascione



6. "Learning how to act and perform is just as important as being at the barre every day, and it gets even more important as you get older." —Jason Celaya


7. "I wish every student understood that EVERYONE can be successful in dance in there own individual way. Someone else's strength does not equal your weakness. As a teacher I truly want each dancer to find their strengths and success, not just some of them." —Kaydee Colobella-Francis



8. "Professional dancers aren't built in a day." —Every dance teacher ever


9. "Be willing to try new styles—not just contemporary. Take some musical theater and jazz classes! In the world of dance or performing arts, there are so many options to fit every artist." —Brandy Murillo Brinkerhoff


10. "Sometimes being held back a bit, and not pushing ahead is really in your best interest, and will actually make you a better dancer in the end. You can still be pushed in a lower level class if you are a hardworker." —Kerri Russell Deshler


11. "Being famous is not the end goal. I'd much rather work with someone who's hardworking rather than famous and well-known." —Jessie Ann James

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