Every dancer wants to open their competition score packet and see high marks that sing their praises. But a less-than-stellar score can quickly sour what was meant to be a positive learning experience.

While winners walk away with cash prizes, glistening trophies and scholarships to their dream schools, it can be tempting to let a low score be your one-way ticket to self-pity city. But with the right mindset, even a lackluster competition performance can be made into a constructive rather than destructive experience.


Sit Down With Your Dance Teacher ASAP

Communication is key to getting the most out of your competition experience. Photo by Stocksnap.

Schedule a meeting with your dance teacher as soon as possible to look at your scoresheet together. They can help you identify areas of improvement and brainstorm a plan to move forward. Withdrawing out of embarrassment only takes away from the time you could be using to improve; tackling what went wrong right away can help you get back on track and avoid dwelling on the negative.

Know That Some Things Are Subjective

Every judge draws from a different background of experiences that influence the way he or she scores. Photo by Unsplash.

While you shouldn't dismiss all of your feedback, know that judges might bring in personal preferences. Some might appreciate subtle artistry and soft port de bras, while others are looking for high extensions and an exciting stage presence.

Mariaelena Ruiz, director of the professional training program at Cary Ballet Conservatory, encourages her students to keep this subjectivity in mind when they look at their scoresheet. "If one completely did not like you but then the other four were consistent in what they said, then you just take it with a grain of salt," she says. Focus on the corrections they've offered but don't get too caught up on comments that are a matter of personal preference.

Focus on Your Progress

The time you spent preparing for the competition likely led to improvements in your technique and artistry. Photo by Michael Afonso via Unsplash.

Preparing for a competition typically means clocking in extra hours and can lead to vast improvements in both your technique and artistry. Rather than obsessing over how you stacked up against your competitors, look at how much you've improved in the last few months. The gains you make during the preparation process mean more than a pretty trophy anyway.

Consider Pursuing Other Dance Opportunities

Try trading in competitions for master classes. Photo by Danielle Cerullo via Unsplash.

If you find that you're more concerned with winning prizes than growing as a dancer, it might be time to take a break from competitions. When Ruiz sees her dancers struggling to pull themselves out of the competition blues, she encourages them to seek out other opportunities that aren't competitive in nature. Consider signing up for master classes or filming some of your favorite solos that you could use for future auditions.

Use It As a Life Lesson

Competitions can help you build resilience, which is a valuable asset in the dance world. Photo by Brooke Meyer.

The dance industry is an incredibly competitive field, so every dancer needs to be equipped to handle disappointment with grace. Kristy Blakeslee, director of KJ Dance in Plano, Texas, sees competitions as an opportunity to teach students life lessons they can apply outside of the studio. "One day somebody will accept us and the next day maybe somebody doesn't accept us, and it's something that we have to become accustomed to and prepare our minds and our hearts for," she says.

Remember That Even Great Dancers Have Bad Performances


Remember when Misty Copeland caught an outrageous amount of flak for struggling with Swan Lake's infamous 32 fouettés? Or when Isabella Boylston fell flat on the floor during her debut in La Bayadère? Even ballet goddesses aren't immune to bad performances and reminding yourself of this can help put things into perspective.

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Choreographer Andrea Giselle Schermoly, center, demonstrating. Photo by Andrew Yew, courtesy of Schermoly

You might think ballet competitions are all about the dancers—offering them valuable exposure, scholarships and job opportunities. They serve as vehicles for growth, with dancers spending countless hours working to perfect every step they'll take in front of the judges. But these same events have also become a way for choreographers to launch their own careers. The competition work they make helps to refine their voices, and it offers the chance to dive further into the creative process with pre-professional students. DT spoke with five award-winning choreographers about their roles on the ballet competition circuit, and how this unique opportunity has both inspired and elevated their craft.

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Dance education for preschoolers has many benefits. It exercises the whole body and the mind. It also creates a love for dance that develops into a lifetime desire for being fit. If you have the insight to get your preschool age children to love learning dance, you have taken the first step in establishing a core of students who will be with you for years to come. Preschool age is when you cultivate an early love of dance, and that is a major responsibility. Studio owners should always have preschool teachers that are high energy, creative and love children.

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You know what unfortunately goes hand in hand with the greatest time of year? The dreaded cold and flu season. But, never fear—you can stay ahead of the curve this year by keeping your immune system working smoothly before the sniffles set in. We've rounded up our best tips and tricks to help you stay healthy (and dancing!) all season long.

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Halloween is on the horizon, which means we should all be embracing the spookiest aspects of the season. If you're a dancer (or dance lover), your list of holiday fun should include watching some seriously fabulous Halloween-themed dancing. Whether it's a live show in a city near you, binge watching old Halloween episodes of your favorite television show, or digging into the black hole of dance videos on YouTube, trust us—it's a riot!

Here are three Halloween-themed dance performances you should DEFINITELY check out!

Have a terrifying time!!!

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Mastering a fish lift, with Nicholas Mishoe and ADA students Connor Medrow and Renee Shubov. Photo by Sori Gottdenker, courtesy of ADA

What makes someone ready to leave a successful performance career to buy a dance school? For Nicholas and Shayne Mishoe, that turning point came while Nicholas was touring in the Netherlands with the Dutch National Ballet. "Dancing late into the night on a hard stage, getting on a bus and driving a couple hours and doing the whole thing again the next day, for a month—one night, I thought, 'I've had enough of this,'" Nicholas says.

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"The life we were living didn't feel sustainable long-term," adds Shayne, who was performing on a project basis in Amsterdam, while also teaching ballet, Pilates and Gyrotonic. Operating their own school had always been their dream, and after Nicholas' bus tour through Holland, the stars aligned. Shayne knew that the founder of her childhood studio in New Jersey, where her mother has also taught since the early 1990s, had been thinking about selling. She and Nicholas talked it out, made the phone call and set the plan into motion.

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As much as we wish otherwise, bullying is something all dance teachers have to deal with at some point in their career. Unfortunately, it just seems to come with the growing pains of aspiring artists (sigh 🙄).

Because it's such a tricky thing to manage, we reached out to dance teachers on Facebook to see how they choose to handle unkindness at their studios.

Check out what these three teachers had to say, and let us know the things you do at your studio to stop bullying in our comments!

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Q: What do you do when a dancer shuts down because of a correction?

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As of today, there are only 13 nights until the spoOoOokiest evening of the year—and just 1 week left, if you're planning to dress up over Halloweekend. Do you have your costume(s) yet?

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Just like foodies pursue their favorite taco trucks, dance lovers can track beloved choreographers and teachers through pop-up events advertised on social media.

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Through Instagram posts, Roberts, who has a background in fitness and architecture, chooses off-beat locations to showcase site-specific choreography for events, like this gallery opening at Long Island City's Cigar Factory. Her strong web presence operates as a 24-hour business card cultivating the element of surprise.

Pop-ups rely on the delight of being in the right place at the right time. Such flashes of intrigue have changed the way consumers engage with products and services, according to "How Pop-Ups Took Over America's Restaurants." Because dance itself is built on impermanence, many artists embrace fleeting moments to market themselves on the web.

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For decades dance teachers have worked tirelessly to get their dancers to look cohesive onstage. From perfectly matched costumes, to the exact brand and style of footUndeez, to buns that are all parted on the exact same side (the bane of my existence), you people know how to get your kids to look uniform. And when it comes to getting your dancers' makeup to match, your attention to detail is no different. You have each spent hours with parents teaching them how to apply it so that it looks just the way you want it to.

Those are precious hours you could have used cleaning choreography or correcting a student's arabesque. Am I right? Thankfully, the internet has come to the rescue and created YouTube tutorials that you can send out to your dancers' parents so you don't have to spend unnecessary time on it. They can even watch the video each time they do their makeup to make sure they get it just right! Heaven bless modern day technology.

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You're welcome, people!

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