10 Fixes for a More Competitive Website

A checklist for you (and your website guru) 

When online marketing professional Alison Krejny began supplementing her budding business career with freelance dance teaching—she’d double majored in dance and business management technology in college—she immediately noticed a disconnect between what she knew about online marketing and what was happening on studio websites. “There was information missing, no images, you couldn’t find phone numbers,” says Krejny. “The big light bulb went off over my head, and I thought, ‘Hey! These people need some help.’” She went on to found and run Ohio-based To The Pointe Marketing, focusing on online advertising for studios and companies.

The website problems Krejny identified aren’t uncommon. Frank Sahlein, CEO of 3rd Level Consulting, estimates that 60 percent of the studio owners he works with are “just kind of wandering around, doing the best job they can,” he says. The good news is that optimizing your website isn’t as complicated as you might imagine: We’ve narrowed it down to 10 ways you can fine-tune your web presence to make it effective, accessible and competitive.

Make sure your website is mobile-friendly. With the explosive growth in smartphone and tablet use, it’s a must that your site be easily viewable on all devices. Mobile users want a page to load quickly, and they want to find the important information near the top. Website templates from providers like WordPress and Squarespace incorporate “responsive” design, which adapts a site’s look and functionality automatically to whatever device it’s being viewed on. “Most website creation tools develop your mobile version as they develop the website itself,” explains Sahlein, at little or no extra cost to you.

2 Provide a good user experience. Your site should be easy to navigate, in addition to pages loading quickly. Think twice before using Flash-based designs: If your images aren’t optimized and are too heavy, they’ll load too slowly. “That can discourage users from staying on the site and doing a search,” says Krejny. “They might move on to the next listing that will load quicker.” (Note: iPhones and iPads don’t support Flash.)

3 Keep your content clear and concise. Give a short description of your studio, and note what sets it apart with bullet points, suggests Sahlein. “People won’t read three paragraphs,” he says. “They’ll read two or three sentences and four bullet points.” Good content will lead to better search results, too. 

4 Include the right keywords. Keywords are words or phrases that your target customers are likely to type into search engines when looking for a site. These should appear in your site’s body text and in each page’s title tag (what shows up at the top of a browser and at the top of an individual tab within a browser). Krejny separates keywords into two categories: industry (dance studio) generic and locality-specific. “You want to include big bang words like ‘dance studio’ and ‘local dance studio’ on your website, because that’s what people are going to search,” she explains. Adding your city name and zip code will let internet users know that your studio is in their area. Aim to include a couple of keywords per webpage.

5 Fill out your contact page completely. Be as specific and clear as you can: Include your e-mail address, hours of operation, studio address (pull in a Google map for viewers to see street intersections) and phone number. Format your phone number with an area code, dashes and no spaces (example: 555-555-8899) so that those viewing your studio website on their mobile devices can click directly on the number to place a call. Sahlein advises including a photo, too, of you, the owner, or your office manager.

6 Share your social media. Does your studio have a Facebook page? Twitter account? Instagram profile? Include links on your homepage to social media, or embed their feeds directly into your website with plug-ins. “Add any images you can,” says Krejny. “Students will eat those up and want to show their friends—‘This is what we’re doing in class!’”

7 Include video or a slideshow of images. According to Sahlein, videos are better and should be no longer than a minute and a half; a slideshow should include no more than 10 rotating pictures. Ideally, a video promoting your studio would show clips from a dance class, with quotes from a student, a parent and an instructor. Your search engine optimization, or SEO, will increase: “Now, Google and Yahoo will crawl through your videos and listen to what words you use,” says Sahlein. “Words are highly rated.” Krejny suggests creating a YouTube channel as an easy way to embed any videos you create directly into your website.

8 Add a blog. Sure, it may seem like one more time-sucker, but it’s also another way to integrate keywords and raise your SEO. “A blog gives search engines a reason to come back and continue to crawl your site, boosting your rankings a little more,” says Krejny.

9 Don’t forget directory listings. Populate your business profile in local directories like Google Places for Business, Bing Local, Yelp and Yellow Pages. For continuity, Krejny advises establishing at least your NAP—name, address and phone number—on each listing profile. Images of your storefront and studios are a good addition, too. Krejny also suggests checking out getlisted.org, where you can enter your studio’s web address and find out what directories you’re already listed in, where you can still claim new listings and where you can improve current listings.

1Know where to put customer reviews. Testimonial quotes—what Sahlein refers to as “social proof”—allow potential clients to identify with your current studio students or parents, making them more likely to choose your studio. But you’ll get more bang for your buck if you include your reviews on your listing profiles, rather than your website. “Google will crawl your listings and see that people like your business,” says Krejny. “This gives you a boost in credibility and will improve your ranking.”

While these fixes are quick and easy to implement, don’t think that your work stops there. “Optimizing your website isn’t a one-time thing,” warns Krejny. “A lot of people set it and forget about it. It really should be something you manipulate every couple of weeks—adding a few new images, updating the content, anything to keep it fresh and engaging.” DT

 Illustration © Anatoliy Babiy/Thinkstock

Dance Teachers Trending
Photo by Jerome Capasso, courtesy of Man in Motion

Finding a male dance instructor who isn't booked solid can be a challenge, which is why a New York City dance educator was inspired to start a network of male dance professionals in 2012. Since then, he's tripled his roster of teachers and is actively hiring.

Keep reading... Show less
Studio Owners
Getty Images

You've got the teaching talent, the years of experience, the space and the passion—now all you need are some students!

Here are six ideas for getting the word out about your fabulous, up-and-coming program! We simply can't wait to see all the talent you produce with it!

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Teachers Trending
Photo by Todd Rosenberg, courtesy of HSDC

This fall Hubbard Street Dance Chicago initiates an innovative choreographic-study project to pair local Chicago teens with company member Rena Butler, who in 2018 was named the Hubbard Street Choreographic Fellow. The Dance Lab Choreographic Fellowship is the vision of Kathryn Humphreys, director of HSDC's education, youth and community programs. "I am really excited to see young people realize possibilities, and realize what they are capable of," she says. "I think that high school is such an interesting, transformative time. They are right on the edge of figuring themselves out."

Keep reading... Show less
Getty Images

Q: What policies do you put in place to encourage parents of competition dancers to pay their bills in a timely manner?

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Teacher Tips
Photo courtesy of Kim Black

For some children, the first day of dance is a magic time filled with make-believe, music, smiles and movement. For others, all the excitement can be a bit intimidating, resulting in tears and hesitation. This is perfectly natural, and after 32 years of experience, I've got a pretty good system for getting those timid tiny dancers to open up. It usually takes a few classes before some students are completely comfortable. But before you know it, those hesitant students will begin enjoying the magic of creative movement and dance.

Keep reading... Show less
Just for fun
Photo via @igor.pastor on Instagram

Listen up, dance teachers! October 7 is National Frappe Day (the drink), but as dance enthusiasts, we obviously like to celebrate a little differently. We've compiled four fun frappé combinations on Instagram for your perusal!

You're welcome! Now, you can thank us by sharing some of your own frappé favs on social media with the hashtag #nationalfrappeday.

We can't wait to see what you come up with!

Keep reading... Show less
Site Network
Original photos: Getty Images

We've been dying to hear more about "On Pointe," a docuseries following students at the School of American Ballet, since we first got wind of the project this spring. Now—finally!—we know where this can't-miss show is going to live: It was just announced that Disney+, the new streaming service set to launch November 12, has ordered the series.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Teacher Tips
Photo by Tony Nguyen, courtesy of Jill Randall

Recently I got to reflect on my 22-year-old self and the first modern technique classes I subbed for at Shawl-Anderson Dance Center in Berkeley, California. (Thank you to Dana Lawton for giving me the chance and opportunity to dive in.)

Today I wanted to share 10 ideas to consider as you embark upon subbing and teaching modern technique classes for the first time. These ideas can be helpful with adult classes and youth classes alike.

As I like to say, "Teaching takes teaching." I mean, teaching takes practice, trial and error and more practice. I myself am in my 23rd year of teaching now and am still learning and growing each and every class.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Teacher Tips
Misti Ridge teaches class at Center Stage Performing Arts Studio. Photo by Arlyn Lawrence , courtesy of Ridge

The dance teachers who work with kids ages 5–7 have earned themselves a special place in dance heaven. They give artists the foundation for their future with impossibly high energy and even higher voices. Enthusiasm is their game, and talent is their aim! Well, that, self-esteem, a love for dance, discipline and so much more!

These days, teachers often go a step beyond giving tiny dancers technical and performative bases and make them strong enough to actually compete at a national level—we're talking double-pirouettes-by-the-time-they're-5-years-old type of competitive.

We caught up with one such teacher, Misti Ridge from Center Stage Performing Arts Studio, The Dance Awards 2019 and 2012 Studio of The Year, to get the inside scoop on how she does it. The main takeaway? Don't underestimate your baby competition dancers—those 5- to 7-year-olds can work magic.

Keep reading... Show less
Site Network
Patrick Randak, Courtesy In The Lights PR

The ability to communicate clearly is something I've been consumed with for as long as I can remember. I was born in the Bronx and always loved city living. But when I was 9, a family crisis forced my mom to send me to Puerto Rico to live with my grandparents. I only knew one Spanish word: "hola." I remember the frustration and loneliness of having so many thoughts and feelings and not being able to express them.

Keep reading... Show less
Studio Success with Just for Kix
Courtesy Just for Kix

As a teacher or studio owner, customer service is a major part of the job. It's easy to dread the difficult sides of it, like being questioned or criticized by an unhappy parent. "In the early years, parent issues could have been the one thing that got me to give up teaching," says Cindy Clough, executive director of Just For Kix and a teacher and studio owner with over 43 years of experience. "Hang in there—it does get easier."

We asked Clough her top tips for dealing with difficult parents:

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get DanceTeacher in your inbox