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Q: The parents of my competition kids keep requesting fundraisers, and it's driving me nuts. In our contract, I said we would do three fundraisers, but now they're pushing for more. What's your fundraising policy?

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Studio Owners

Searching for a beau to love on this Valentine's Day, teachers? Look no further than your very own studio. Check out these 12 signs your studio is ACTUALLY your Valentine this year (and every year).👇

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Studio Owners
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Q: How do you keep track of the latest apps to use in your classroom?

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Studio Owners
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Make your studio the go-to choice for every kid who wants to dance

Studio owners agree that it can be tricky to maintain a thriving student base of dancers who take only a class or two a week. Kids are busy trying any number of extracurricular activities—soccer, cheerleading, piano lessons—and parents are anxious to see what sticks. How do you compete? We talked with four savvy owners who've built a loyal following of once-a-week dancers with conscious programming and well-tailored scheduling.

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Studio Owners

About five years ago when instructor Alicia Dean-Hall needed to fill her classes at Central Park Dance studio in Scarsdale, New York, where she was a business partner with the owner, her obvious choice was to promote her services on Groupon.

"Running a Groupon was a no-brainer," she says. "If I had done an ad in the newspaper or something in the PennySaver, I would have had to pay a fee. Groupon is free, so I had nothing to lose."

However, she didn't expect the promotion to take off so well. Her growing class numbers coupled with the success of her Groupon promotions—about 100 for each promotion—enabled her to end her partnership with Central Park Dance studio and run her Dance Fit classes as her own business, while renting space from the studio, which benefits the studio and herself.

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Studio Owners
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No matter how stellar your teaching or choreo-graphy skills, having a strong resumé is necessary in today's competitive market.

And it's not all formatting and bullet points. A resumé is a marketing tool to spotlight why you're the most desirable candidate to studio owners and convention directors. But let's be honest, creating one is not a fun and easy task. Selling yourself on paper requires finesse and raises plenty of questions. Do I list every job I've ever had? What's more important: Credentials or experience? Does the one-page format still apply?

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Q: After running my studio six days a week for 20 years, it's time for me to delegate. How can I transition into a shared-workload system with my teachers?

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Studio Owners
What are your non-negotiables? Share on Dance Teacher's Facebook page.

It could be argued that half the battle of owning a dance studio is getting people to follow the rules. To ensure your business will run like a well-oiled machine, it helps to have clear expectations in place for students and their families—and, most important, to make sure everyone knows them from day one. Of course, every school is unique, and behavior that may be acceptable to you might be out of the question for someone else. "There are so many studios out there," says Dana McGuire, a studio co-owner in North Kansas City, Missouri. "Know and stand by what you're about." Here, four seasoned studio directors discuss the issues they consider non-negotiable.

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