Seen and Heard at the Dance Teacher Summit: Nancy Giles

Posted on July 31, 2014 by

It’s here! As of 2 pm today, registration will be open onsite for our Dance Teacher Summit. (Check out the full schedule for more information.) And starting at 3 pm, studio owners are invited to take part in the Studio Owner Only Session in the Hilton’s Gramercy Ballroom. We hope to see you there!

DT spoke to Summit ambassador Nancy Giles about how to handle parent drama and make time for herself.

NancyGiles

Giles, fourth from left, with other Summit ambassadors

Nancy Giles

Owner
Southern Strutt
Irmo, South Carolina
600 students

Dance Teacher: What has been the biggest change you’ve made to your studio practices since opening?                              

Nancy Giles: All my studios have observation windows, where I used to invite parents to watch the children. I wanted them to see the passion and how hard we were working. Over the years, however, it became a place to gossip and argue, so then we started limiting the windows to once a month. But still, it got so bad that teachers couldn’t walk out the door to go to the bathroom without parents jumping all over them about why their child wasn’t in the front row. Now I have closed the windows and parents are not allowed in the building at all. They are typically just allowed to drop off and pick up, and now, when I invite them in to watch, it’s a privilege.

Thirty years ago, parents would say, “Do what you can for my child. I trust and respect you.” But today’s parent-teacher-child relationship is different. Society makes people feel entitled, like everybody has to win and everybody has to be the best. Because the world has changed, our approach had to change.

DT: How did you present such a drastic policy change to parents?

NG: I have a parents’ meeting every year, and that’s what I addressed that year. I said I wanted to get back on track with parent trusting child trusting teacher. I told them we wanted to make the atmosphere more conducive to learning. I said, “We know how much concern you have for your child, but with all of you being there, it keeps us from being the best teachers we can be. We feel like we don’t have the freedom to correct your child. You’re paying us to teach them, and that requires corrections.”

I expected it to be a really hard change. I was so worried that I hired somebody to sit in my lobby. I didn’t call her a bouncer—I called her lobby patrol. A few parents tried to get in, but once they saw I was serious, they respected the rule. Once we made the change, it was a clean, healthy separation.

DT: How do you make sure you’re comfortable taking time away from the studio?

NG: I’m 58, and there comes a time when you realize there’s more to life. My whole career I’ve surrounded myself with good faculty, and I’m always looking to hire graduates who have grown up in the studio and know what we do. That’s why I’m able to trust and be more free to live the other part of my life at this age. My daughter also has been working with me for the last 10 years. I can leave knowing that everything will be as if I were here. —Andrea Marks

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Break the Floor Productions

 

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