Seen and Heard at the Dance Teacher Summit: Kim DelGrosso

Posted on July 17, 2014 by

At our Dance Teacher Summit this August, you’ll learn countless valuable lessons from our Summit ambassadors, movement classes and business seminars. Kim DelGrosso (DT, April 2012) spoke to Dance Teacher about how studio owners can generate alternative income for their business.

KD

DelGrosso (center, in white) with her students

Kim DelGrosso
Co-owner, Center Stage Performing Arts Studio
Orem, UT
700 students

Dance Teacher: Studio owners often need to look beyond tuition and costume purchases to support their businesses. What are the most unique ways you’ve found to bring in additional revenue to your studio?

Kim DelGrosso: We’ve had a creative year! Of course we rent to different dance groups in the area, but there are so many more ways you can be making money. I have a performing arts preschool and kindergarten that rent from me and a bunch of boutiques that set up in our studios. We’ve rented to colleges, we’ve had fencing classes here—any type of meeting or class that needs a big room, we try to get them to come to us. I make sure everyone in town knows my studio’s available for auditions—Disney has held a few auditions here. We also bought some good-quality chairs that people can set up for meetings, and it’s proven to be a good investment.

DT: Sounds like you’re open to anything! How can a studio owner who’s never done anything like this get started?

KD: Yes, everything is game! And a large part of it is just doing the work to let people know you’re there. For example, when I opened my first studio, I literally went through the white pages and called every person in town, telling them I was starting a studio and I’d love for them to come. Because of that, we opened with 450 students. If you make yourself known, they will come to you. Call local businesses, go to your chamber of commerce, participate in charities, build good relationships with your town’s newspapers. And don’t forget to use your studio parents for their resources and connections. Networking is where it’s at! —Andrea Marks

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Kim Delgrosso

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