Sponsored by Dance Teacher Web
Courtesy Dance Teacher Web

While summer usually sparks dreams of warm vacations in the sun, many dance teachers don't have the luxury of taking a week off to lounge by the pool. But what if a stellar educational opportunity for dance instructors just happened to take place in sunny Las Vegas?

The Dance Teacher Web Conference and Expo, happening August 4–7 and founded and directed by longtime successful studio owners and master teachers Steve Sirico and Angela D'Valda Sirico, gives dance teachers and administrators a chance to learn, network and recharge during a one-of-a-kind working vacation. Here, attendees can rub shoulders with esteemed industry professionals, get inspired by a variety of workshops and even walk away with a new certification or two:

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Sponsored by Akada Software
Photo by Jenny Studios, courtesy of Utah Dance Artists

Running a dance school used to involve a seemingly endless stream of paperwork. But thanks to the advent of software tailored specifically for dance studios' needs, those hours formerly spent pushing papers can now be put to better use.

"Nobody opens a dance studio because they want to do administrative work," says Brett Stuckey, who leads Akada Software's support team. "It's our job to get you out of the office and back into your classroom."

We talked to Stuckey about how a studio software program can streamline operations, so you can put your energy toward your students.

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Enter to win the Dance Teacher Video of the Month. We welcome any and all kinds of dance. You can demonstrate technique or combinations, rehearsal, or classroom success—or show a performance. Submit as many different videos as you would like—just keep each under five minutes long. The winner will be featured in Dance Teacher magazine, online and on our social media channels.
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Debbie Allen, Mia Michaels and Allen's daughter at their studio in Los Angeles. Photo via Allen's Instagram

It's no surprise that many dance teachers have children who go on to become teachers themselves. Countless hours spent teaching—on the road or at the studio—makes the classroom a second home and developing a passion for dance practically second nature. But for some teachers, seeing their kids develop a passion for dance comes as a surprise. Take longtime tap instructor at Chapman University Brandee Lara Barnaby.

"If someone had told me that my kid would end up in dance education, I wouldn't have believed them," says Barnaby, who won the 2015 Dance Teacher Award in the Higher Education category. Her son Dante Lara, who now teaches tap in Southern California, started teaching after graduating from Chapman University. "I had some of the best teachers in the world growing up, starting with my mom, and I owe it to these mentors to be the best dance teacher I can," says Dante.

A young Dante with his mom and tap legend Gregory Hines. Photo courtesy of Lara Barnaby

Here are three other teachers who also had kids who went on to teach.

Denise Wall and Travis Wall

When it comes to the Wall family, the more appropriate point to raise is how could you not become a dancer if your mom and teacher was Denise Wall? But since conquering "So You Think You Can Dance" as a contestant, Travis has gone on to prove he's just as gifted as a teacher and choreographer.


Kim DelGrosso and Ashly Costa

Kim DelGrosso, co-owner of Center Stage Performing Arts Studio in Utah, has taught "So You Think You Can Dance" stars Ashleigh and Ryan Di Lello, and "Dancing With the Stars" pros Chelsie Hightower, Julianne and Derek Hough and Ashly Costa, who happens to be DelGrosso's daughter. Costa has now made a name for herself bringing ballroom class to the convention circuit. Clearly, the apples didn't fall far from this dancing family tree.



Debbie Allen and Vivian Nixon

This mother-daughter powerhouse duo has got it all. The remarkable Debbie Allen needs no introduction, but in case you didn't know, her daughter Vivian, who danced on Broadway in Memphis and Hot Feet, is a also a regular teacher at her mom's studio in Los Angeles. Based on the caption below, it's no surprise Nixon followed in her mother's footsteps.


If you're looking to find new teaching jobs or just expand your reach as a teacher, look no further than your Instagram account. Developing a digital voice that connects with studios and dancers is an easy (and cost-free) strategy to boost your profile.

"Instagram has definitely shined a spotlight on my gifts as a teacher," says Kelby Brown, who's taught for American Ballet Theatre and at conventions like The PULSE.

"I have had many inquiries about teaching master classes or being asked to be on faculty at different schools. It has also kept dance competitions in the know and reminds them to bring me out as a judge and educator."


Here, Brown offers his insights to make your Insta account start working for you.

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Dance Teacher Tips
Ailey II's Khalia Campbell. Photo by Kyle Froman, courtesy of Ailey

Win It!

All New Program – Road to One / Touch & Agree / Breaking Point Saturday, March 17 at 8 pm or Sunday, March 18 at 3 pm.

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Dance Teacher Tips

Longtime accompanist Olga Bazilevskaya knows firsthand that when it comes to music, dancers and musicians speak different languages. "Early on in my her career, a teacher asked me to play a six and I was very confused," says Bazilevskaya. "Did she want a 6/8, six counts or a six-bar phrase?" Six-bar phrases don't really exist in classical ballet, Bazilevskaya thought to herself. To a musician, a "polynaise" is the term that Bazilevskaya would've understood best. "If it's not explained or specific," says Bazilevskaya, "it can be confusing to a musician."

When Bazilevskaya first started out playing for ballet classes, she realized quickly that every teacher has their own style and preferences for class, as well as how they communicate what they want. In an effort to fill the, at times, precarious gap between dance teachers and accompanists, Bazilevskaya will lead a Ballet Accompanist Training Intensive March 11–May 6 at Steps on Broadway in New York City.

For teachers not used to working with an accompanist, here are some more helpful hints to make the relationship work for everyone.

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Dance Teacher Tips
Photo by Sean Boyd, courtesy of White

Julie Hammond White is an associate professor at the University of Southern Mississippi, where she directs the dance education BFA. Here, the mother of two (Townsend, 10, and Dominic, 7) takes us through a typical week of juggling her personal and professional life. We caught up with White in October on the first day of work after her fall break. —Jill Randall

Monday

6:30–10 am Up and trying to rouse the boys. Throw in a load of laundry, pack lunches, set out uniforms. Drop kids off at school and head to the library. Finish planning advanced ballet.

10:30–11 Read 99 (?!) work e-mails. Taking a few days off is a bad idea…

11 am–12:30 pm Teach advanced ballet. I'm doing what I call "vitamin phrases": 2- to 3-minute phrases that focus on one aspect of ballet (this week, petit allégro).

12:40–1:55 Teach Methods in Dance Education. This is a course that all juniors, regardless of their major (performance/choreography or dance ed), must take to learn how to effectively teach dance in K–12, studios, higher education or community programs.

3:30–4 Grab a quick salad at restaurant across the street. Read letters from the promotion committee—passed the first stage of being recommended for full professor!

4–6 Grade DED 360 papers. These take a while. DED 360 is one of two writing- and speaking-intensive classes for the major. In their papers, students comment on eight areas of diversity as defined by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and find a media resource that addresses each to compare and contrast their views.

7–8 Grocery: bread, cantaloupe, Go-GURTS, apples, bananas, peanut butter, Nutella, pasta, cheese and oatmeal.

8–9 Laundry. Three loads. Also do a quick pickup of the house.

9 Boys home from day with Dad. They shower, brush teeth and set out their clothes for tomorrow. I sign homework and read them a story. Hugs and kisses, then bed by 10 pm.

10–10:30 More e-mails. Bed.

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