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Teachers, Are You Looking for Great Material to Enhance Your Online Curricula?

This Bitter Earth. Photo by Sam Wootton, courtesy of NYCB

Create a Watch Party! Here are four free offerings from New York City's most celebrated arts organizations to share with your students and their families.


New York City Ballet

Excerpt of Christopher Wheeldon's This Bitter Earth performed by Sara Mearns and Adrian Danchig-Waring.

"Words cannot fully capture the beauty or essence of this moving pas de deux, but for me it speaks to our times," says Wendy Whelan, who originated Mearns' role when the ballet premiered in 2012. "It honors where we have come from and the challenges we face moving forward into the unknown. The choreography inspires reflection from both its performers and audience and I hope, for you, conveys a peaceful sense of hope for the future."

American Ballet Theatre

Every week, Monday through Thursday, @ABTSchool Instagram and YouTube offers daily virtual classes taught by former ABT dancers, ABT JKO faculty and ABT teaching artists, who are all certified in the ABT National Training Curriculum.

#ABTots (Ages 2–4): Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10 am EST

Primary (Ages 5–8): Mondays and Wednesdays at 2 pm EST

Lincoln Center at Home

#Concerts for Kids: Wednesday, April 8 at 4 pm

Zeshan B brings an Indo-Pakistani feel to soul, blues, and more

For family audiences, #ConcertsForKids are new, short concerts recorded by the artists themselves. The performances will premiere at LincolnCenter.org, Lincoln Center's YouTube Page, and on Lincoln Center's Facebook Page and will be available after, on demand for families to enjoy whenever is convenient.

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

Full-length videos of the company's repertory.

April 2–5: Ailey II in Yannick Lebrun's Saa Magni and Bradley Shelver's Where There Are Tongues

April 9–12: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Judith Jamison's Divining

Teaching Tips
Courtesy Jill Randall

Fall may be fast-approaching, but it's never too late to slip in a little summer reading—especially if it'll make you all the more prepared for the perhaps crazier-than-usual season ahead.

Here are six new releases to enrich your coming school year:

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Sponsored by A Wish Come True
Courtesy A Wish Come True

Studio owners who've been in the recital game for a while have likely seen thousands of dance costumes pass through their hands.

But with the hustle and bustle of recital time, we don't always stop to think about where exactly those costumes are coming from, or how they are made.

If we want our costumes to be of the same high quality as our dancing—and for our costume-buying process to be as seamless as possible—it helps to take the time to learn a bit more about those costumes and the companies making them.

We talked to the team at A Wish Come True—who makes all their costumes at their factory in Bristol, Pennsylvania—to get an inside look at what really goes into making a costume, from conception to stage.

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Studio Owners

Jana Belot's 31-year-old New Jersey–based Gotta Dance has six studios, 1,720 students and, usually, 13 recitals. In a normal year, Belot rents a 1,000-seat venue for up to 20 consecutive days and is known for her epic productions, featuring her studio classes and Gotta Dance's pre-professional dance team, Showstoppers. Until March, she was planning this year's jungle-themed recital in this same way.

When the pandemic hit, Belot soon decided to do a virtual recital instead. Due to the scale of the production—300 to 500 dancers performing in each of the 13 shows—postponing or moving to an outdoor venue wasn't practical. (Canceling, for her, was out of the question.)

Unsurprisingly, Belot's virtual recital was just as epic as her in-person shows—with 10,000 submitted videos, animation, musicians and more. Here's how it all came together, and what it cost her.

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