Dancer Health
From repairing muscles to memorizing movement, sleep is essential for dancers' bodies and brains. Thinkstock

If you've led morning classes or rehearsals, you may be familiar with those dancers who enter the studio carrying a coffee from the closest café, or whose floor stretches look, in part, like an excuse to stay horizontal—and perhaps you feel their pain. Denise Warner Limoli is familiar with this scene; she teaches 9 am ballet classes at Skidmore College. Sleepy dancers, she notices, tend to be slow on the pickup. “A dancer usually has very fast responses, and sleep-deprived dancers are a little slow to react," she says. “They don't learn assigned combinations quickly, or they make mistakes that they should not be making at their level of accomplishment."

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Dance News

Have you ever stopped to consider how many times a day you look at your phone? According to a recent report, smartphone users check their phones approximately 150 times a day, often while using another screen, like a TV or computer. That’s a lot of screen time! Dr. David Spiegel, director of the Stanford Center on Stress and Health, says constant exposure to light from screens causes people to shift away from natural sleep cycles, which could lead to fatigue and mental fogginess. Making an effort to limit your screen time each week––during the weekend, for example—will keep you sharp.

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