Teaching Tips
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Professions across the globe hold yearly conferences, and the dance industry is certainly no exception. Annual conferences exist for dance teachers, dance medicine professionals, dance educators and more. Taking the time out to attend them can be well worth your while for a number of different reasons. Let's take a closer look at four of them.

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Emily Giacalone, modeled by Nicole Kennedy of Marymount Manhattan College

We get it: Dance is exhausting, and sometimes all you want to do during a quick break is, well, nothing. Bill Evans, director of the Evans Somatic Dance Institute, recommends the following options, which are both relaxing and recuperative for the stresses dance puts on your body. From energizing restorative poses to deep breathing, here are five ways to make your downtime work for you.

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Dancers can train themselves to do many things—dance on pointe, bust out 32 fouettés, lift other dancers. But can a dancer, or anyone for that matter, train herself to need less sleep? According to sleep expert Dr. Sigrid Veasey, the answer is no. Studies show that people don’t actually adjust to decreased sleep. The deprivation just distorts their cognitive functioning and ability to assess their own sleep needs.

The average healthy adult needs 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night, and teens need 8 to 10. Stimulation from caffeine, exercise or screen time can negatively impact a person’s sleep-wake cycle, especially later in the day.

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