Merce Cunningham Dance Company performing TV Rerun at Westbeth in 1975. Photos by Jack Mitchell, courtesy of Walker Art Center

“Merce Cunningham: Common Time," an eight-gallery collection of stage sets, costumes, music, film and a series of live performances at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, continues through July 30. The exhibition highlights the prolific postmodern choreographer's many collaborations with artists such as John Cage, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Robert Morris.

Keep reading... Show less

Win It!

Trisha Brown

By Susan Rosenberg

Wesleyan University Press; 407 pages; $31.00

Undeniably one of the most important artists of our time, Trisha Brown's artistic principles, spirit and prolific body of work are captured within the pages of this book. Art historian Susan Rosenberg draws from Brown's archives, including interviews with colleagues to track the evolution of her career and how Brown reshaped modern dance with groundbreaking artistry, choreography and visual art.

Enter below to win!

[formidable id=128]

Trending
Nijinsky in costume for Afternoon of a Faun. Photo by Baron Adolf De Meyer, courtesy of the New York Public Library

Dance history is inundated with risk-takers, but these three legends took it to a whole other level, pushing the boundaries of what was possible. For today's #ThrowbackThursday, take a moment to remember these three iconic figures.

Keep reading... Show less
Trending
Photo courtesy of the Dance Magazine archives

Yvonne Rainer is a New York City–based choreographer who was a leading member of Judson Dance Theater, the 1960s avant-garde dance collective that rejected modern dance. In 1965 Rainer wrote her famous "No Manifesto," a public dismissal of the qualities that exemplified then-current concert dance styles: spectacle, glamour, virtuosity. Her resulting choreographic work, Trio A (1966), epitomized the minimalist aesthetic of postmodern dance.

Keep reading... Show less
(clockwise from top left) Douglas Dunn, Steve Paxton, David Gordon, Becky Arnold, Yvonne Rainer and Barbara Lloyd Dilley. Photo courtesy of Dance Magazine archives

“When they entered, they were hidden by huge winglike constructions made from parachutes. Carolyn Brown moved down the center line of the rink on pointe, while the men rolled down the edges of the rink and, having reached the opposite end, spiraled around, switched paths, and rolling back to their starting points, swooped around to pick Brown up as she returned along the center line. They partnered her, lifting her and carrying her as they skated in circles and figure eights..."

Keep reading... Show less

Get Dance Business Weekly in your inbox

Sign Up Used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.