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Photo by Suzanne Faulkner Stevens, courtesy of Lincoln Center

How many of us have hovered breathlessly over our iPads, watching grainy YouTube footage of Gelsey Kirkland and Mikhail Baryshnikov in Theme and Variations? Or Suzanne Farrell in Mozartiana? (Hundreds of thousands of us, to be exact.) Well, get ready: Yesterday, Lincoln Center announced its brand new Dance Week, a series of seven online broadcasts devoted to our favorite art form. Part of Lincoln Center at Home, the organization's new portal for digital offerings, the six-day fest will feature performances by Ballet Hispánico, American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet, School of American Ballet and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. What's particularly exciting is that some of these—including the aforementioned Theme and Variations and Mozartiana—are legendary performances of yesteryear.

Ready to hear the lineup? Check it out below, then tune in to Lincoln Center's website or Facebook page to watch the performances.

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Rainer in Trio A. Photo by Herbert Migdoll, courtesy of Dance Magazine archives

As a founding member of the 1960s New York City–based dance collective Judson Dance Theater, Yvonne Rainer was one of the 20th century's most innovative choreographers. But did you know that she had an equally remarkable career as a filmmaker from 1972 to 1996?

Today through Thursday, the Film Society of Lincoln Center is featuring Talking Pictures: The Cinema of Yvonne Rainer. See Rainer's films at the Francesca Beale Theater alongside those of her contemporaries and a couple of her personal favorites. Check out the lineup.

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Grab a partner and do-si-do (starting tonight at Lincoln Center with ABT) because a new study reveals that the neurological effects of social dances, like country dancing, the minuet or fandango, help to better protect our brains from aging, compared to other forms of exercise.

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George Balanchine

The first-ever hall of fame honoring performing artists and advocates will open at Lincoln Center in New York City next month. Legends at Lincoln Center: The Performing Arts Hall of Fame will recognize those who have contributed to the Center’s 60-year legacy. The first annual group of six inductees includes Broadway producer Harold Prince and Tony Award–winner Audra McDonald. They will be honored at a ceremony in June.

Jerome Robbins

A separate group of inductees, the Founding Legends, will also be featured to pay homage to those who made a historical impact. The group of 30 inductees includes choreographers George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, New York City Ballet co-founder Lincoln Kirstein and NYCB artistic director Peter Martins.

David Geffen Hall, home of the New York Philharmonic, will serve as permanent residence for the hall of fame in 2021 after renovations are complete. Until then, smaller exhibits will be on display at Geffen Hall and Alice Tully Hall.

Peter Martins

Photos (from top): by Tanaquil LeClercq, by Frederic Ohringer, by Paul Kolnik, by George Platt Lynes, courtesy of New York City Ballet (4)

Lincoln Kirstein

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This Friday marks the 14-year anniversary of the horrific events of September 11, 2001. For the fifth year in a row, former Martha Graham dancer and choreographer Jacqulyn Buglisi revives her 2011 site-specific performance piece The Table of Silence Project 9/11. Working in collaboration with Italian artist Rossella Vasta, Buglisi summons more than a hundred NYC dancers to gather around the Revson Fountain at Lincoln Center’s Josie Robertson Plaza for the 31-minute movement tribute. Dressed in white, dancers circle the fountain performing simple gestures in unison, concluding with a minute of silence as the dancers raise their arms toward the sky. Audience members are invited to join in this final gesture.

For its fifth annual rendition, three special dancers will participate in the performance:

-       Sixteen-year-old Sydney dances in memory of her father, who was killed in one of the towers.

-       A young dancer honors her father, who survived and was one of the firefighters at the scene.

-       Kitty Lunn is the artistic director of Infinity Dance Theatre––a nontraditional dance company featuring dancers with and without disabilities. Now a paraplegic using a wheelchair, Lunn participates in the tribute every year.

The Table of Silence Project 9/11 will be held Friday, September 11, 8:15–8:46 am. The event is free and open to the public. Additionally, it will be streaming live online. For more info, visit: tableofsilence.org.

Photo by Terri Gold

2011's tribute at Lincoln Center

To commemorate the 12th anniversary of the September 11th attacks next Wednesday, choreographer Jacqulyn Buglisi and her Buglisi Dance Theatre will present the “Table of Silence Project 9/11” for the third time at Lincoln Center. The performance, which begins at 8:15 am and ends promptly at 8:46 am (precisely when American Airlines Flight II crashed into the North Tower), brings together over 100 dancers from the New York City community of dance artists. The dancers will circle the Revson Fountain in Lincoln Center (on the corner of West 64th Street and Columbus Avenue) and end the tribute by turning their open palms to the sky, with arms raised above head, for one full minute. Audience members are invited to do the same, in an effort to evoke peace. Buglisi is joined by two collaborators: visual artist Rossella Vasta and flautist Andrea Ceccomori.

Can’t make it in person? The tribute will be live-streamed at buglisidance.org at 8:15 am, Eastern Standard Time, on September 11.

Photo by Terri Gold

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