Just for fun
Courtney Schwartz and Jake Mcauley perform a Talia Favia combination at Radix Dance Convention Nationals. Via Instagram

Summer intensives and Nationals make June, July and August some of the richest dance-video months of the year. There is so much fabulous content out there, we can hardly contain our excitement!

We have spent hours down the rabbit hole of class videos this week and thought you should see some of our favorite findings.

Enjoy!

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Dance Teacher Summit
Lisa Johnson-Willingham. Photo by Rachel Papo

When Lisa Johnson-Willingham isn't at our Dance Teacher Summit teaching the lateral Ts, flat backs and pelvic hinges that are the hallmarks of Horton technique, she directs the Ailey Extension, offering a schedule of open community classes in New York City at the Joan Weill Center for Dance. Before beginning her arts education career, Johnson-Willingham was a member of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater for five years under Judith Jamison.

Mark Your Calendar

Join us in Long Beach, CA, July 26–28, or in NYC, August 1–3, for our 2019 Dance Teacher Summit.

Dance Teacher Tips
Photo by Jayme Thornton for Dance Magazine

When choosing music for tap, Jason Samuels Smith encourages teachers to start with classic jazz music. Improvisation, call and response, and syncopated rhythms embedded in the genre and its history, in general, help students to understand the structure of tap, which is different than other styles of dance. "Tap dancers have the responsibility to be more than just a visual artist," he says. "They're an instrument and a sound."

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Dance Teacher Summit
Photo by Rachel Papo

Tapper Anthony Morigerato is known for his crazy-fast feet. In fact, he holds the world record for "most tap sounds in one minute"—1,163, if you're wondering. He has performed with Michael Minery's Tapaholics, the musical group Matt and Anthony, Stacey Tookey's Still Motion, and on several television shows. Here in this photo, he's sharing some of his favorite tap phrases at our Dance Teacher Summit.

Mark Your Calendar

Join us in Long Beach, CA, July 26–28, or in NYC, August 1–3, for our 2019 Dance Teacher Summit.

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Q: Do you require all of your ballet teachers to have a set syllabus? Why or why not?

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Studio Owners
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Rarely does a week in the summer go by without at least one of your classes needing a substitute teacher. Your team of teachers has worked tirelessly all year, and after surviving Nationals (or your studio's big summer intensive) they deserve to take a family vacation or two.

But filling those classes with substitutes can get tricky in the middle of July and August. EVERYONE is going on vacation at this time of year—not just your staff teachers.

To keep you from getting left high and dry this summer, we recommend you beef up that go-to sub list, so that if one teacher can't do it, another one can. No need to cancel class—we've got you covered!

You're welcome!

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Dance Teachers Trending
Lani Corson. Photo by Royce Burgess, courtesy of Corson

Aerial work is growing in popularity in the dance world these days. Don't believe us? Check out this Dance Magazine article! If you're a studio owner who didn't grow up with aerial training (let's face it, how many of us really did?), then you may be feeling a little apprehensive about what to look for when bringing on a new aerialist faculty member. You know exactly what you want from your ballet teachers, your jazz teachers, your tap teachers, heck—even your tumbling teachers! Aerial, however, is a whole other ballgame.

To help you feel confident you're bringing in a teacher who is safe for your dancers, we sat down with Lani Corson, NYC aerialist, circus performer, adjunct professor at Pace University and teacher at Aerial Arts NYC, to get the inside scoop on exactly what you should be looking for.

Enjoy!

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Studio Owners
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It's summertime, which means we're all starting to feel HOT! HOT! HOT!

While a warm room is certainly better than a cold room when it comes to dancing, you don't want your students to get heat stroke at your studio. To help you survive this sweaty time of year, here are tips and tricks that will keep your classrooms comfortable for an excellent class.

Enjoy!

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