Story Time

Full of magical adventures, beautiful illustrations, life lessons and, of course, dance, these children’s books make the perfect addition to your studio’s bookshelf.

 

The Barefoot Book of Dance Stories
 

by Jane Yolen and Heidi E.Y. Stemple
 

Illustrations by Helen Cann
 

Barefoot Books, 2010

 

This collection takes readers around the world—each of the eight stories is based in a different culture with notes to teach children how to perform the dance from each tale—the waltz from The Twelve Dancing Princesses, Noh Dancing from Robe of Feathers, flamenco from The Shepherd’s Flute and more. British actress Juliet Stevenson also narrates the stories on CD—a perfect addition for dancers who are too young to read.
Info: www.barefootbooks.com

 

The Sleeping Beauty Ballet

by Aleksandra Effimova

Orchid Publishing, 2011

 

This storybook of the classic ballet, The Sleeping Beauty, is designed to entertain and educate students ages 2 to 6. “Miss Aleksandra’s Themes & Values” are integrated throughout, offering thoughtful lessons like, “Carabosse holds a grudge against the King and Queen for 18 years. Does it feel good to hold a grudge?”
Info: www.growingthrougharts.com

 

Tap Shoes and Horse Shoes

by Tana Macy

Illustrations by Nancy Gardiner

Strategic Book Group, 2011

 

This rhyming story will inspire your dancers to try tap, especially the boys. Tap Shoes and Horse Shoes takes place on a farm in the town of Hill, where young Bill (son of Will and Jill) struggles with two left feet. When a dance studio opens up in town, Bill discovers that he can dance—and his pet horse Horace can, too! Info: www.strategicpublishinggroup.com

 

Wallie Exercises

by Steve Ettinger

Illustrations by Pete Proctor

Active Spud Press, 2011

 

Written to aid in the battle against childhood obesity, Wallie Exercises tells the story of an inactive puppy who, with the help of Edwin, the Exercise Elephant, learns that working out can be fun. Step-by-step instructions teach the Silly Shark Squat or Wallie Wiggle Wag Walks. Colorful illustrations showing Wallie in action will crack up your youngest students (ages 4 to 8) and teach them important fitness lessons for life. Info: www.wallyexercises.com

 

Carla and Leo’s World of Dance

by Agatha Relota

Illustrations by Thierry Perez

Thames & Hudson, 2011

 

Ten-year-old best friends Carla and Leo stumble across a dance studio on their way home from school, and they’re instantly hooked! From the fox-trot to the cha-cha to the samba, this book details ballroom styles from across the globe. And, to help students put their movements in context, it also explains the culture, music and
history that go along with each dance. Info: www.carlaandleo.com

 

Bunheads

by Sophie Flack

Little, Brown and Company, 2011

 

Former New York City Ballet dancer Sophie Flack’s first novel will appeal to your studio’s pre-teen population. It tells the tale of 19-year-old Hannah Ward as she navigates the beginnings of a career in ballet. This behind-the-scenes look at professional dance life is full of drama—from the struggle for perfection to the added complication of a little romance—so young adult readers won’t be able to put it down. Info: www.hachettebookgroup.com

 

(Photo by Emily Giacalone)

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