#RelationshipGoals: Broadway Soul Mates Elizabeth Parkinson and Scott Wise

Scott Wise and Elizabeth Parkinson. Photo by Rachel Papo.

Elizabeth Parkinson and Scott Wise momentarily consider the most challenging part of leaving behind their Tony and Astaire Award–winning performance careers. Now full-time teachers at their school FineLine Theatre Arts, the married couple look into each other's eyes and simultaneously reply, “Three-year-olds!"

Wise: “Those three-year-olds don't care who you think you are."

Parkinson: “It's terrifying."

Wise: “And you know you're setting a precedent for dance for them . . ."

Parkinson: “For their whole lives!"


Parkinson and Wise rarely work in the same room. Wise teaches acrobatics, musical theater and tap, while Parkinson teaches ballet, modern and jazz. They attribute their school's growing success to their different training backgrounds and styles. Several of their students have worked professionally in companies like MOMIX and shows like Billy Elliot.

Wise fronting the chorus. Photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy of The Publicity Office.

Given Wise's natural stage prowess, it's remarkable that his teaching style is so patient. “Scott," says Parkinson, “performs with an intensity that borders on frightening. Absolute joy and absolute anger are easy for him to reach." Born in Pocatello, Idaho, Wise studied, he says, “at every Dolly Dinkle school imaginable. Every one of my teachers taught me something about performance." But it was his mother who helped him the most. Despite the fact that dance performance was considered unmanly, he says, “She wanted me to have something special to call my own." In his 20s Wise moved east to study ballet (after excelling in gymnastics), but he never lost his western style.

Remembering his first glimpse of Parkinson in rehearsals, Wise recalls, "She was sitting on the floor putting on her ballet shoes for jazz class," and "She was wearing an old raggedy knit unitard." But he saw beyond the clothes. Photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy of The Publicity Office.

Like her husband, Parkinson isn't one to put on airs. She stunned her fellow Joffrey Ballet dancers when she left her principal position there to perform with smaller companies (Eliot Feld and Donald Byrd) and to work on the opposite side of the tracks—Broadway. She didn't take a conventional training route either. At age 9, growing up in Tampa, Florida, she tried ballet and didn't think much of it. She returned to it at 13 years old and never stopped, bucking the perception that if a ballet dancer doesn't begin training before she reaches puberty, she will never turn pro. “I really see how your experiences shape how you are as a teacher," says Parkinson, who encourages her students to study acting and to find their passion—whatever it is.

"For us to have a school," says Parkinson, whose commitment to her students borders on the devout, “we need to really love it." Wise wholeheartedly agrees: “It's amazing how close you get to the kids."

Music
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Securing the correct music licensing for your studio is an important step in creating a financially sound business. "Music licensing is something studio owners seem to either embrace or ignore completely," says Clint Salter, CEO and founder of the Dance Studio Owners Association. While it may seem like it's a situation in which it's easier to ask for forgiveness rather than permission—that is, to wait until you're approached by a music-rights organization before purchasing a license—Salter disagrees, citing Peloton, the exercise company that produces streaming at-home workouts. In February, Peloton settled a music-licensing suit with the National Music Publishers' Association out-of-court for an undisclosed amount. Originally, NMPA had sought $300 million in damages from Peloton. "It can get extremely expensive," says Salter. "It's not worth it for a studio to get caught up in that."

As you continue to explore a hybrid online/in-person version of your class schedule, it's crucial that your music licenses include coverage for livestreamed instruction—which comes with its own particular requirements. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about music licensing—in both normal times and COVID times—as well as some safe music bets that won't pose any issues.

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A 2019 Dancewave training. Photo by Effy Grey, courtesy Dancewave

By now, most dance educators hopefully understand that they have a responsibility to address racism in the studio. But knowing that you need to be actively cultivating racial equity isn't the same thing as knowing how to do so.

Of course, there's no easy answer, and no perfect approach. As social justice advocate David King emphasized at a recent interactive webinar, "Cultivating Racial Equity in the Classroom," this work is never-ending. The event, hosted by Dancewave (which just launched a new racial-equity curriculum) was a good starting point, though, and offered some helpful takeaways for dance educators committed to racial justice.

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The author, Robyn Watson. Photo courtesy Watson

Recently, I posted a thread of tweets elucidating the lack of respect for tap dance in college dance programs, and arguing that it should be a requirement for dance majors.

According to onstageblog.com, out of the 30 top-ranked college dance programs in the U.S., tap dance is offered at 19 of them, but only one school requires majors to take more than a beginner course—Oklahoma City University. Many prestigious dance programs, like the ones at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and SUNY Purchase, don't offer a single course in tap dance.

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