Publisher of Dance Magazine Announces New Ownership

Frederic M. Seegal has acquired DanceMedia, a suite of five respected publications (both print and digital) written for and by dancers, including the renowned Dance Magazine, which marks its 90th year of publication in 2017.

Seegal, Vice Chairman of Peter J. Solomon Company, has made his career advising major media, telecom and internet clients. He brings to DanceMedia a seasoned knowledge of and passion for the performing arts, having served as President of American Ballet Theatre’s Board of Trustees, and as trustee for New York City Center, San Francisco Symphony and San Francisco Opera. Currently, he is a trustee for Gallim Dance, based in New York.

“I’m very excited about the potential for growth represented by these highly respected publications and the tremendous content they’ve created over the years,” says Seegal. “These magazines have enjoyed exceptional stability during a time when there has been sweeping change in the publishing industry, as they have continued to be the authoritative voice for the entire dance world.”

“The DanceMedia publications deliver the most effective and highly targeted opportunities for the industry—in both print and online,” says Amy Cogan, Senior Vice President & Group Publisher. “Our reach is unsurpassed. This vote of confidence in our properties can only boost their effectiveness as we move into the future.”

In addition to Dance Magazine, which is regarded as the most trusted content in the field of dance, the DanceMedia titles, with a combined reach of more than 2 million, include: Dance Spirit, written for dancers who aspire to “So You Think You Can Dance,” Pointe for students training pre-professionally for careers in ballet, Dance Teacher for studio owners and educators in conservatories, k–12 schools, and on faculty with colleges and universities. Dance Retailer News is the only monthly b2b publication connecting dance manufacturers with storeowners who serve the buying public.

Macfadden Communications Group, which has owned Dance Magazine since 2001 and DanceMedia since its formation in 2006, will continue to provide publishing services for the brand, including digital services, print management, circulation and accounting, according to Carolyn Callahan, President and Chief Operating Officer. “The opportunities presented by this new affiliation assure a solid future for these titles,” Callahan says. “We look forward to a lasting partnership.” No changes in staffing are anticipated.

Music
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Securing the correct music licensing for your studio is an important step in creating a financially sound business. "Music licensing is something studio owners seem to either embrace or ignore completely," says Clint Salter, CEO and founder of the Dance Studio Owners Association. While it may seem like it's a situation in which it's easier to ask for forgiveness rather than permission—that is, to wait until you're approached by a music-rights organization before purchasing a license—Salter disagrees, citing Peloton, the exercise company that produces streaming at-home workouts. In February, Peloton settled a music-licensing suit with the National Music Publishers' Association out-of-court for an undisclosed amount. Originally, NMPA had sought $300 million in damages from Peloton. "It can get extremely expensive," says Salter. "It's not worth it for a studio to get caught up in that."

As you continue to explore a hybrid online/in-person version of your class schedule, it's crucial that your music licenses include coverage for livestreamed instruction—which comes with its own particular requirements. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about music licensing—in both normal times and COVID times—as well as some safe music bets that won't pose any issues.

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Teaching Tips
A 2019 Dancewave training. Photo by Effy Grey, courtesy Dancewave

By now, most dance educators hopefully understand that they have a responsibility to address racism in the studio. But knowing that you need to be actively cultivating racial equity isn't the same thing as knowing how to do so.

Of course, there's no easy answer, and no perfect approach. As social justice advocate David King emphasized at a recent interactive webinar, "Cultivating Racial Equity in the Classroom," this work is never-ending. The event, hosted by Dancewave (which just launched a new racial-equity curriculum) was a good starting point, though, and offered some helpful takeaways for dance educators committed to racial justice.

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Higher Ed
The author, Robyn Watson. Photo courtesy Watson

Recently, I posted a thread of tweets elucidating the lack of respect for tap dance in college dance programs, and arguing that it should be a requirement for dance majors.

According to onstageblog.com, out of the 30 top-ranked college dance programs in the U.S., tap dance is offered at 19 of them, but only one school requires majors to take more than a beginner course—Oklahoma City University. Many prestigious dance programs, like the ones at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and SUNY Purchase, don't offer a single course in tap dance.

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