Peter Chu

Music for contemporary dance

Peter Chu’s career has been so demanding that until recently, he hadn’t had a permanent address in more than five years. He was living on the road, with his belongings in a storage facility that he would return to between gigs: teaching at 24 Seven Dance Convention, choreographing for several companies and “So You Think You Can Dance,” directing his own troupe, chuthis., and dancing in Crystal Pite’s Kidd Pivot.

What keeps him calm amid all the chaos is improvisation. “I’m not a master, but I’m really passionate about it,” says Chu, whose ultra-fluid style nearly masks its tricky athleticism. “Getting into the studio and giving myself tasks like putting a phrase on the floor or moving from just the head or the elbow has helped me find my own groove. It’s about finding a different flavor. Even the kind of improv where I go out and groove at a club helps me figure out who Peter Chu is.” DT

Artist: Johann Johannsson

Work: Virthulegu Forsetar, Part 1

“This sets the tone for my class. There’s a real weightlessness to it, with enough space in the music to focus on breath control and simplicity of movement. Its liquid-like quality helps you move from the bone, not the muscle, which is healthier for the body.”

Artist: Woodkid

Song: “Baltimore’s Fireflies”

“I use this to guide improvisational jams and warm-ups. It has a natural and beautiful build, and a colorful tone that makes it so powerful.”

Artist: Jamie Woon

Album: Mirrorwriting

“I use this entire album to create movement phrases. It helps me be free and explore different ways of moving. It has a calm R&B flavor. His voice is so soulful that it resonates and vibrates.”

Artist: Esquivel

Album: The Best Of

“My imagination runs free when I listen to his quirky style. I love his attention to detail and wide range of instrumental combinations. It’s so rich. There are many rhythms to choose from, and his music never fails to bring me back to 1950s Las Vegas.”

Artist: Marvin Gaye

Song: “What’s Going On”

“Every time I hear his music I stop everything I’m doing and just move—I can live inside it. It’s rich, colorful and honest. And it reminds me of why I dance, bringing me back to the core of my movement style.”

Photo by Levi Walker, courtesy of Laura Murray Public Relations

Dance Teacher Awards

Who knew that a virtual awards ceremony could bring our community together in such a powerful way?

Last night, we celebrated the annual Dance Teacher Awards, held virtually for the first time. Though it was different from what we're used to, this new setting inspired us to get creative in celebrating our six extraordinary honorees. In fact, one of the most enlivening parts of the event was one that could only happen in a Zoom room: Watching as countless tributes, stories and congratulations poured in on the chat throughout the event. Seeing firsthand the impact our awardees have had on so many lives reminded us why we chose to honor them.

If you missed the Awards (or just want to relive them), you're in luck—they are now available to watch on-demand. We rounded up some of the highlights:

Keep reading... Show less
News
Rambert artistic director Benoit Swan Pouffer had input on the new Rambert Grades curriculum. Photo by Camilla Greenwell, Courtesy Rambert

British dance company and school Rambert has launched a new contemporary-dance training syllabus. Rambert Grades is intended to set a benchmark in contemporary-dance training, focused on three strands: performance, technique and creativity. Moving beyond the Graham and Cunningham techniques that form the basis of most modern-dance training in the UK, it includes contributions from current high-profile choreographers Hofesh Shechter, Alesandra Seutin and Rambert artistic director Benoit Swan Pouffer.

Keep reading... Show less
For Parents
Getty Images

As studios in many areas begin to open up with safety protocols in place, dance students are, of course, itching to get back into class. But just because dancers can go back to in-person training doesn't mean all families are ready for their children to actually do so.

As a parent, it's understandable to feel caught between a rock (your dancer's will to attend in-person class) and a hard place (your concerns surrounding COVID-19). Yet no matter how many tears are shed or how much bargaining your dancer tries, the bottom line is that when it comes to issues of health and safety, you—the parent—have the final say.

Still, there may be ways to soften the blow, as well as best practices for setting or amending expectations. We asked Danielle Zar, a child and adolescent psychotherapist who specializes in parent education, to share some tips for this tricky situation.

Keep reading... Show less

Get Dance Business Weekly in your inbox

Sign Up Used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.