Site Network

No Class Because of Coronavirus? Here's Where You Can Train Online

Quinn Wharton, Courtesy CLI Studios

Just because "social distancing" means your classes got canceled, your training doesn't need to stop. Some studios are livestreaming their classes to students. Some dancers are giving themselves kitchen-counter barre. But there are also several online classes that can keep your technique sharp from home. Check out these seven options:


STEEZY

STEEZY focuses on various urban dance styles like house, dancehall, krump, breaking, whacking and heels. The interface allows you to view the instructor from multiple angles, slow down the speed, loop a particular step or watch yourself dancing on the screen right alongside the instructor so you can compare your technique. After a seven-day, free trial, plans are offered on a monthly or annual basis. $19.99/month or $99.99/year.

Operation: Tap

Tap stars Anthony Morigerato, Ayodele Casel and Mike Minery founded Operation: Tap to offer online classes for beginners through advanced professional tap dancers. A subscription comes with fun bonuses, like technique challenges every Tuesday and videos of original tap productions—along with behind-the-scenes footage. $15–$40/month.

Of course, you'll also want to make sure you've got a solid tap floor at home before ripping up your hardwood. Check out these options from Stagestep and Harlequin.

Veyette Virtual Ballet School

For interactive personal ballet coaching, check out Veyette Virtual Ballet School. It was recently launched by Miami City Ballet principal soloist Lauren Fadeley and her husband, former Pennsylvania Ballet principal Francis Veyette. Their one-on-one lessons via Skype focus on proper technique and a healthy mindset. Veyette and Fadeley also offer small group lessons for studios and competition coaching, plus mentoring sessions for both students and parents. Private lessons are $100/hour.

Dancio

Dancio, a ballet-focused online training platform that also offers contemporary and modern classes, is offering academic institutions a free, two-week subscription right now. Or you can rent individual classes for a 48-hour period, for $4.99. Teachers include everyone from ballet stars, like Julie Kent and Wendy Whelan, to Martha Graham Dance Company's Blakely White-McGuire and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Khalia Campbell.

Founder Caitlin Trainer asks those interested in accessing the free, two-week trial to email dancioinsider@gmail.com. To arrange longer-term group subscriptions, email mydancio@gmail.com.

CLI Studios

CLI Studios partners directly with dance studios to offer live or prerecorded master classes as well as continuing education for faculty members and competition choreography. The program was co-founded by a group of commercial stars including tWitch, Allison Holker and Teddy Forance, and the roster of faculty members reads like a Who's Who of the industry. There are currently more than 150 hours of training available online. Starts at $100/month.

Learntodance.com

If you want to try a new style while stuck at home, Learntodance.com offers free online step-by-step tutorials in everything from tango to Irish step dancing. Or you can purchase a full course for more advanced instruction, from $37–$147.

DancePlug

Learn new choreography with easy-to-follow tutorials on DancePlug. There are combinations and technique exercises in classic styles like theater dance, lyrical, contemporary, ballet and jazz. The site also offers strength and conditioning workouts. Plans start at $29/month.

Teaching Tips
A 2019 Dancewave training. Photo by Effy Grey, courtesy Dancewave

By now, most dance educators hopefully understand that they have a responsibility to address racism in the studio. But knowing that you need to be actively cultivating racial equity isn't the same thing as knowing how to do so.

Of course, there's no easy answer, and no perfect approach. As social justice advocate David King emphasized at a recent interactive webinar, "Cultivating Racial Equity in the Classroom," this work is never-ending. The event, hosted by Dancewave (which just launched a new racial-equity curriculum) was a good starting point, though, and offered some helpful takeaways for dance educators committed to racial justice.

Keep reading... Show less
Higher Ed
The author, Robyn Watson. Photo courtesy Watson

Recently, I posted a thread of tweets elucidating the lack of respect for tap dance in college dance programs, and arguing that it should be a requirement for dance majors.

According to onstageblog.com, out of the 30 top-ranked college dance programs in the U.S., tap dance is offered at 19 of them, but only one school requires majors to take more than a beginner course—Oklahoma City University. Many prestigious dance programs, like the ones at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and SUNY Purchase, don't offer a single course in tap dance.

Keep reading... Show less
Teaching Tips
Getty Images

After months of lockdowns and virtual learning, many studios across the country are opening their doors and returning to in-person classes. Teachers and students alike have likely been chomping at the bit in anticipation of the return of dance-class normalcy that doesn't require a reliable internet connection or converting your living room into a dance space.

But along with the back-to-school excitement, dancers might be feeling rusty from being away from the studio for so long. A loss of flexibility, strength and stamina is to be expected, not to mention emotional fatigue from all of the uncertainty and reacclimating to social activities.

So as much as everyone wants to get back to normal—teachers and studio owners included—erring on the side of caution with your dancers' training will be the most beneficial approach in the long run.

Keep reading... Show less

Get Dance Business Weekly in your inbox

Sign Up Used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.