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Which Broadway Shows Are Performing in Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade?

Photo courtesy of Macy's, Inc.

As you're prepping your Thanksgiving meal, why not throw in a dash of dance?

This year's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is stuffed (pun intended) with performances from four stellar Broadway shows, the Radio City Rockettes and students from three New York City dance institutions.

Tune in to NBC November 28 from 9 am to noon (in all time zones), or catch the rebroadcast at 2 pm (also in all time zones). Here's what's in store:


Ain't Too Proud: The Life and Times of The Temptations

Ephraim Sykes, in a dark suit and black-rimmed glasses, stands in a spotlight while holding a microphone stand.

Ephraim Sykes in Ain't Too Proud

Matthew Murphy, Courtesy DKC/O&M

Catch Sergio Trujillo's Tony-winning choreography, and the especially phenomenally smooth moves of Ephraim Sykes as Temptations frontman David Ruffin.

Beetlejuice

Beetlejuice, in a white-and-black striped suit, waves his jazz hands.

Alex Brightman as Beetlejuice

Matthew Murphy, Courtesy Polk & Co.

Set aside tradition and dive into the deathly fantastical world of Beetlejuice, brought to life by Connor Gallagher's choreography.

Hadestown

Amber Gray dances in a green dress, while a man plays trombone. The Workers Chorus dances behind her.

The cast of Hadestown, featuring Amber Gray

Helen Maybanks, Courtesy DKC/O&M

Head into the Underground with the cast of Hadestown, which took home eight Tonys this year. David Neumann's dances bring an understated, contemporary flair to this poignant retelling of Orpheus and Eurydice.

Tina: The Tina Turner Musical

A production still from Tina. Tina, in a short gold dress, sings, flanked by a band to her right and backup singers to her left.

Adrienne Warren and the cast of Tina

Manuel Harlan, Courtesy Polk & Co.

The parade floats will be rolling. And Tina Turner, played by the fiery Adrienne Warren, will be "rollin' on the river," with moves courtesy Anthony Van Laast.

Radio City Rockettes

A group of Rockettes in gold costumes laugh in their dressing room.

The Radio City Rockettes

Courtesy MSG

A parade staple, the Rockettes will add to the holiday cheer with their signature kickline.

Plus, appearances from the next generation of dancers

The celebration wouldn't be complete without some tiny dancers. Keep an eye out for kids from Jacques d'Amboise's National Dance Institute in the opening number, joining characters from the Muppets and "Sesame Street." Later on, students from The Ailey School will perform "Rocka My Soul" from Ailey's Revelations, and Manhattan Youth Ballet dancers will join Lea Michele of "Glee" fame.

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