News

The MTV Video Music Awards Will Never Be the Same Thanks to J. Lo's Insane Performance

Last night Jennifer Lopez "danced the night away" at the MTV Video Music Awards, and though no words can truly do justice to her jaw-dropping performance, we have to try. The dance legend began her 10-minute mash-up of best hits descending from the heavens, like the dance goddess she is—and somehow things only got better from there. The 49-year-old pulled out some of the fiercest moves we've ever seen, proving why she's such an icon in the industry.

After the performance, Lopez graciously accepted the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award, becoming the first Latina artist to receive the title. "Music, acting, performing—this career has always been an obsession for me... I kind of had to forge my own path and rules," Lopez said. And then she paid the ultimate compliment to her mother Guadalupe Rodríguez, calling her "the original dancing queen. Anybody who knows Lupe knows that's where I get my skills from," she told the crowd.

The only way MTV will ever be able to outdo this performance is if they get J. Lo and her mom up on that stage next year for a duet. Till then, we'll just be over here replaying this epic routine.

Sponsored by A Wish Come True
Courtesy A Wish Come True

With so much else on your plate, from navigating virtual learning to keeping your studio afloat, it can be tempting to to cut corners or to settle for less in order to check "costumes" off of this season's to-do list. Ultimately, though, finding a costume vendor you trust is paramount to keeping your stress levels low and parent satisfaction high, not to mention helping your students look—and feel—their absolute best. Remember: You are the client, and you deserve exceptional service. And costume companies like A Wish Come True are ready to go above and beyond for their customers, but it's important that you know what to ask for. Here are some tips to make sure you are getting the most out of your costume company.

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Higher Ed
Charles Anderson (center) in his (Re)current Unrest. Photo by Kegan Marling, courtesy of UT Austin

Given the long history of American choreographers who have threaded activism into their work—Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, Donald McKayle, Joanna Haigood, Bill T. Jones, Jo Kreiter, to name a few—it's perhaps surprising that collegiate dance has offered so little in the way of training future generations to do the same.

Until now, that is. Within the last three years, two master's programs have cropped up, each the first of its kind: Ohio University's MA in community dance (new this fall), and the University of Texas at Austin's dance and social justice MFA, which emerged from its existing MFA program in 2018. These two programs join the University of San Francisco's undergraduate performing arts and social justice major, with a concentration in dance, which has been around since 2000.

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Teacher Voices
Getty Images

As many dance teachers begin another semester of virtual teaching, it is time to acknowledge the fact that virtual classes aren't actually accessible to all students.

When schools and studios launched their virtual dance programs at the beginning of the pandemic, many operated under the assumption that all their students would be able to take class online. But in reality, lack of access to technology and Wi-Fi is a major issue for many low-income students across the country, in many cases cutting them off from the classes and resources their peers can enjoy from home.

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