Site Network

Gene Kelly Classic 'An American in Paris' Is Coming to Movie Theaters for 2 Days Only

Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in a scene from An American in Paris. Courtesy Fathom Events.

If you loved Christopher Wheeldon's An American in Paris on Broadway, you can now see the 1951 Oscar-winning movie it's based on in all its Technicolor glory. Fathom Events will present MGM's An American in Paris, starring Gene Kelly and French ballerina Leslie Caron, and with music by George and Ira Gershwin, in select theaters nationwide January 19 and 22.


The story follows former WWII GI Jerry Mulligan (Kelly), an American expatriate in Paris trying to make a living as an artist. Along the way he falls in love with a shop girl, Lise (a then-19-year-old Caron), who unbeknownst to him is his friend's fiancée. Naturally, a love triangle ensues.

While Kelly was already an established star, the movie marked Caron's film debut. Kelly, who was also the film's choreographer, had spotted her onstage in France while she was dancing with Roland Petit's Ballets de Champ de Elysées, and asked her to do a screen test for the role. She went on to star in Gigi, Daddy Long Legs and other musicals.

An American in Paris is packed with singing, dancing and Hollywood glamour. But Kelly's 17-minute dream ballet finale is what really sets the musical apart. (The ballet alone, with its elaborate sets and cast of thousands, cost $450,000 to produce. And that was almost 70 years ago!) It's what made me rent this movie over and over again as a young dancer. And, fun fact: former New York City Ballet principal Robbie Fairchild, who played the original Jerry Mulligan on Broadway, has said that Gene Kelly was his biggest role model growing up. To see if An American in Paris is coming to a cinema near you, click here and enter your zip code.

Studio Owners
Courtesy Tonawanda Dance Arts

If you're considering starting a summer program this year, you're likely not alone. Summer camp and class options are a tried-and-true method for paying your overhead costs past June—and, done well, could be a vehicle for making up for lost 2020 profits.

Plus, they might take on extra appeal for your studio families this year. Those struggling financially due to the pandemic will be in search of an affordable local programming option rather than an expensive, out-of-town intensive. And with summer travel still likely in question this spring as July and August plans are being made, your studio's local summer training option remains a safe bet.

The keys to profitable summer programming? Figuring out what type of structure will appeal most to your studio clientele, keeping start-up costs low—and, ideally, converting new summer students into new year-round students.

Keep reading... Show less
Dancer Diary
Claire, McAdams, courtesy Houston Ballet

Former Houston Ballet dancer Chun Wai Chan has always been destined for New York City Ballet.

While competing at Prix de Lausanne in 2010, he was offered summer program scholarships at both the School of American Ballet and Houston Ballet. However, because two of the competition's winners that year were Houston Ballet's Aaron Sharratt and Liao Xiang, dancers Chan idolized, he turned down SAB. He joined Houston Ballet II in 2010, the main company's corps de ballet in 2012, and was promoted to principal in 2017. Oozing confidence and technical prowess, Chan was a Houston favorite, and even landed himself a spot on Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch."

Keep reading... Show less
Music
Mary Mallaney/USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance, courtesy Osato

In most classes, dancers are encouraged to count the music, and dance with it—emphasizing accents and letting the rhythm of a song guide them.

But Marissa Osato likes to give her students an unexpected challenge: to resist hitting the beats.

In her contemporary class at EDGE Performing Arts Center in Los Angeles (which is now closed, until they find a new space), she would often play heavy trap music. She'd encourage her students to find the contrast by moving in slow, fluid, circular patterns, daring them to explore the unobvious interpretation of the steady rhythms.

Keep reading... Show less

Get Dance Business Weekly in your inbox

Sign Up Used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.