Health & Body

3 Exercises for Healthy Spinal Alignment

Denise Wall demonstrates her T-neck alignment imagery. Photo by Matthew Murphy

Spinal alignment is like turnout, says Michael Kelly Bruce, associate professor of dance at The Ohio State University. "It's a mechanism, not an aesthetic." But as with turnout, dancers' visual goals often lead them to force their bodies into unnatural positions. "A healthier spine has to do with acknowledging the structural integrity of what's there, as opposed to changing it to meet that aesthetic," he explains. He compares a spine without its natural curves to winging the foot. "It's gorgeous in arabesque, but you don't want to stand on it. It's not very supportive," he says. Ballet dancers are particularly prone to extremes in erasing the curves from their backs. "People from New York City Ballet dance gorgeously, but in my opinion, their spines are weird," says Bruce.


In his classes, Bruce coaches students to understand their torsos in three dimensions. When cueing dancers' spinal flexion, he focuses on lengthening the back rather than contracting the front. “The images I work with are on the opposite side," he says. “It's about lengthening the vertebra away from one another, and as a result, the front works."

Having dancers work on movement while lying on the floor is particularly helpful, he says, because it lets them use gravity in a different way to make familiar movements easier or more challenging. Here, he shares a floor series for finding mobility, stability and length in the spine.

Finding Spinal Articulation on All Fours

In this series, Bruce asks students to focus on the expanding side of the body more than the contracting side to stay aware of the torso's three-dimensionality.

Cat/Cow

Tabletop. Photo by Emily Giacalone


Cat. Photo by Emily Giacalone


Cow. Photo by Emily Giacalone


• Begin in tabletop position on hands and knees with your spine's curves intact and your scapula lying flat.

• Inhale and feel your ribs expand.

• Exhale and curve the spine from tail to skull, articulating through each vertebra. As you move through the upper thoracic, pull your scapula away from each other.

• Inhale and expand into the dome shape.

• Exhale, flexing the hips as you lengthen out through each vertebra, establishing the curves of the spine back to your tabletop position.

• Inhale, lifting your eyes and sitz bones at the same time to cow. Don't drop into it; instead, extend the spine.

• Exhale, lengthening all four sides of the spine back to tabletop position.


Lateral Flex

Photo by Emily Giacalone


Photo by Emily Giacalone

• Exhale to lengthen your right side (bending to your left), drawing the right side of the rib cage away from the pelvis and right ear away from the sitz bones. Return to the starting position.

• Repeat four times on the exhales, then four times on the other side.

• Then do four sets on each side moving as you inhale.


Around the World

• Exhale, lengthening your spine in one action to cat.

• Inhale, lengthening your right side to move into a side bend to the left.

• Continue inhaling to cow.

• Exhale straight back up to cat.

• Repeat for a total of four half circles this direction. Then go the other way.

• Finish on an exhale in cat, feeling your posterior ribs expanding. Exhale to lengthen back to tabletop.


Love Your Curves: Spinal Edition

The typical spine has four curves from bottom to top—sacral, lumbar, thoracic and cervical—and correct posture doesn't mean flattening them out. On the contrary, it is essential to actively support those curves. Looking from the side, someone should be able to draw an imaginary line from a dancer's earlobe through her shoulder joint, hip and knee, ending just in front of the ankle joint. Maintaining correct alignment takes some strength, however. That's why dancers who haven't developed abdominal strength often have a swayed lower back.

When making corrections, sometimes dancers overcompensate, leading to tucked bottoms or a jutting chin. Here's how some of our experts help dancers find alignment without overshooting.

Irene Dowd Photo by Kyle Froman

Place a fingertip on the crown of the dancer's head, right above the ears. Tell the student to get taller, pressing against your finger toward the sky. Be careful not to place your finger too far forward, or you'll encourage the student to tilt her head up instead of growing taller through her central axis. —Irene Dowd, anatomy expert, The Juilliard School

Denise Wall Photo by Matthew Murphy

Standing behind the student, hold the shoulder joints between your fingers and thumbs, and pull them apart gently. Have the dancer imagine her body is a letter T, with the torso as the vertical line and the shoulders along the top. This helps spread her back muscles away from the spine instead of pinching the shoulders back and sticking out the ribs or hunching the shoulders forward. —Denise Wall, teaching alignment through imagery at Denise Wall's Dance Energy

Megan Williams Photo by Kyle Froman

Finding the neutral pelvis can be tricky, because dancers have strong muscles that want to take over, like glutes and quads. Have a student take a demi-plié, and feel how the pelvis hangs without much support. Have her try to maintain the vertical position of her pelvis as she straightens her legs. There should be a crease at the front of her hips. Tucking erases that crease. —Megan Williams, former Mark Morris Dance Group company member


Teacher Voices
Getty Images

In 2001, young Chanel, a determined, ambitious, fiery, headstrong teenager, was about to begin her sophomore year at LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts, also known as the highly acclaimed "Fame" school. I was a great student, a promising young dancer and well-liked by my teachers and my peers. On paper, everything seemed in order. In reality, this picture-perfect image was fractured. There was a crack that I've attempted to hide, cover up and bury for nearly 20 years.

Keep reading... Show less
Health & Body
Getty Images

Though the #MeToo movement has spurred many dancers to come forward with their stories of sexual harassment and abuse, the dance world has yet to have a full reckoning on the subject. Few institutions have made true cultural changes, and many alleged predators continue to work in the industry.

As Chanel DaSilva's story shows, young dancers are particularly vulnerable to abuse because of the power differential between teacher and student. We spoke with eight experts in dance, education and psychology about steps that dance schools could take to protect their students from sexual abuse.

Keep reading... Show less
Technique
Nan Melville, courtesy Genn

Not so long ago, it seemed that ballet dancers were always encouraged to pull up away from the floor. Ideas evolved, and more recently it has become common to hear teachers saying "Push down to go up," and variations on that concept.

Charla Genn, a New York City–based coach and dance rehabilitation specialist who teaches company class for Dance Theatre of Harlem, American Ballet Theatre and Ballet Hispánico, says that this causes its own problems.

"Often when we tell dancers to go down, they physically push down, or think they have to plié more," she says. These are misconceptions that keep dancers from, among other things, jumping to their full potential.

To help dancers learn to efficiently use what she calls "Mother Marley," Genn has developed these clever techniques and teaching tools.

Keep reading... Show less

Get Dance Business Weekly in your inbox

Sign Up Used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.