Studio Owners

Ask the Experts: How Do I Keep My Competition Team Motivated Right Now?

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The first e-mail that we sent out talked about how the studio would be closed for two weeks and everyone should be practicing social distancing and staying healthy and well. We recorded some YouTube classes for all the recreational levels as well as some "boot camp" and warm-up classes for our full-time and part-time comp teams to stay in shape.


As April approached and it looked like we would be staying closed longer, we started sending out the competition rehearsal videos for the numbers we'd been working on before closure. We also signed up and paid for CLI online classes. Once we registered as a studio, our dancers were able to take advantage of all the CLI online classes at no charge, and we encouraged them to dance and take class every day. We made the decision that no monthly fees or any other type of payment would be charged until we were back in the studio running classes again.

We also put out daily challenges for each week: Move It Mondays, TikTok Tuesdays, etc. We have had Zoom chats to check in with each level of our competitive teams. Talking to all our dancers made all of us feel better, and hopefully the dancers felt better, as well. We continue to post new classes and challenges on social media and YouTube, and we send an e-mail weekly. There is a famous quote that we're keeping in mind: "Life is 10 percent what happens and 90 percent how we handle it."

News
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It can be tricky to get away for a conference, whether due to travel budget concerns or finding a substitute to cover your absence. One silver lining of the pandemic is that five conferences are now available online, no travel necessary. You'll find sessions to address your concerns no matter what your role in the dance community—whether you're on the business side, interested in curriculum development, need continuing ed certification, or a performer who wants to teach. Why not gather colleagues from your studio or school for an educational watch party to inspire you as you launch into the new school year?

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Health & Body
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Talar compression syndrome means there is some impingement happening in the posterior portion of the ankle joint. Other medical personnel might call your problem os trigonum syndrome or posterior ankle impingement syndrome or posterior tibiotalar compression syndrome. No matter what they name it—it means you are having trouble moving your ankle through pointing and flexing.

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News
Scott Robbins, Courtesy IABD

The International Association of Blacks in Dance is digitizing recordings of significant, at-risk dance works, master classes, panels and more by Black dancers and choreographers from 1988 to 2010. The project is the result of a $50,000 Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources.

"This really is a long time coming," says IABD president and CEO Denise Saunders Thompson of what IABD is calling the Preserving the Legacy and History of Black Dance in America program. "And it's really just the beginning stages of pulling together the many, many contributions of Black dance artists who are a part of the IABD network." Thompson says IABD is already working to secure funding to digitize even more work.

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