Barre + Bag Is the Subscription Service Dancers Have Been Waiting For

Courtesy of barre + bag

Subscription box services have quickly gained a dedicated following among the fashion and fitness set. And while we'd never say no to a box with new jewelry or workout wear to try, we've been waiting for the subscription model to make its way to the dance world.


Enter barre + bag, a new service that sends a curated set of items to your door each season. Created by Faye Morrow Bell and her daughter Tyler, a student in the pre-professional ballet program at University of North Carolina School of the Arts, this just-launched service offers dance, lifestyle and wellness finds in four themed bags each year: Spring Performance, Summer Study, Back-to-Studio and Nutcracker. Since all the products are specifically made for dancers, everything barre + bag sends you is something you'll actually use, (Plus, it all comes in a bag instead of a box—because what dancer can ever have enough bags?).

barre + bag's Summer Collection

Barre + bag's summer collection is currently on sale for $40 on their site. It includes a copper water bottle, organic lip balm (with SPF!), deodorant wipes, a hot/cold gel pack, pointe shoe humidors, deodorizing foot spray, and a clear, vinyl drawstring bag.

Making the whole thing even sweeter, barre + bag's site also features an inside look at what professional and pre-professional dancers keep in their bags, as well as dancer hacks we can all steal. We're already obsessed with the dancer-focused subscription box, and we can't wait to see what barre + bag comes up with for Nutcracker season (sorry for reminding you).

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