Site Network

Our 8 Favorite Ballet TED Talks

Earlier this month we learned that former comp star and current UC Berkeley student Miko Fogarty will be giving a TEDx talk in March about her path from ballet to college. This news got us thinking about some of our favorite ballet TED talks from years past. Check out our top eight now!


Michaela DePrince: "From 'Devil's Child' to Star Ballerina"

You might already be familiar with Michaela DePrince's ultra-inspirational journey from an orphanage in Sierra Leone to the Dutch National Ballet, but hearing her story in her own words takes it to a whole new level.

"The Physics of the 'Hardest Move' in Ballet"

Understand the physics of fouetté turns in this short and sweet TED-Ed video. We know that the animated ballerina doesn't have perfect technique (those biscuits!), but it's a fascinating explanation of something we take for granted, and it might be able to help you get closer to the famous 32.

Claudia Schreier: "Thinking On Your Feet"

In this TEDx video, ballet choreographer Claudia Schreier pulls back the veil on her creative process, and discusses the way that choreographic principals can apply to the infinite variations of human relationships.

Juliet Doherty: "Be Great!"

Here, a 15-year-old Juliet Doherty, braces and all, shares her idea of what being great really means. Fresh off her gold medal win at 2012's Youth America Grand Prix, Doherty explains how she learned to stop judging herself and focus on dancing.

"The Origins of Ballet" 

This animated video from TED-Ed gives a super concise version of the history of ballet, from Italian Renaissance courts to today. All in four and a half minutes... Impressive, right?

Darcey Bussell: "The Evolution of Ballet"

If you're looking for a slightly more in-depth take on ballet history, this talk by former Royal Ballet principal Darcey Bussell is for you. Bussell emphasizes innovations in costuming and includes performance clips from Anna Pavlova, Galina Ulanova and Margot Fonteyn.

Misty Copeland: "The Power of Ballet"

In this 2012 video from TEDxGeorgetown, Misty Copeland talks about the history of black dancers in ballet, citing luminaries like Arthur Mitchell, Lauren Anderson and Raven Wilkinson, and stresses the importance of sharing the stories of those who came before her.

Robert Binet: "Challenging Gender Stereotypes"

In this 2015 talk from TEDxToronto, National Ballet of Canada associate choreographer Robert Binet discusses his work Orpheus Becomes Eurydice, which turned the familiar myth's gender roles on their heads. The video includes excerpts from his ballet, performed live.

Teaching Tips
A 2019 Dancewave training. Photo by Effy Grey, courtesy Dancewave

By now, most dance educators hopefully understand that they have a responsibility to address racism in the studio. But knowing that you need to be actively cultivating racial equity isn't the same thing as knowing how to do so.

Of course, there's no easy answer, and no perfect approach. As social justice advocate David King emphasized at a recent interactive webinar, "Cultivating Racial Equity in the Classroom," this work is never-ending. The event, hosted by Dancewave (which just launched a new racial-equity curriculum) was a good starting point, though, and offered some helpful takeaways for dance educators committed to racial justice.

Keep reading... Show less
Higher Ed
The author, Robyn Watson. Photo courtesy Watson

Recently, I posted a thread of tweets elucidating the lack of respect for tap dance in college dance programs, and arguing that it should be a requirement for dance majors.

According to onstageblog.com, out of the 30 top-ranked college dance programs in the U.S., tap dance is offered at 19 of them, but only one school requires majors to take more than a beginner course—Oklahoma City University. Many prestigious dance programs, like the ones at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and SUNY Purchase, don't offer a single course in tap dance.

Keep reading... Show less
Teaching Tips
Getty Images

After months of lockdowns and virtual learning, many studios across the country are opening their doors and returning to in-person classes. Teachers and students alike have likely been chomping at the bit in anticipation of the return of dance-class normalcy that doesn't require a reliable internet connection or converting your living room into a dance space.

But along with the back-to-school excitement, dancers might be feeling rusty from being away from the studio for so long. A loss of flexibility, strength and stamina is to be expected, not to mention emotional fatigue from all of the uncertainty and reacclimating to social activities.

So as much as everyone wants to get back to normal—teachers and studio owners included—erring on the side of caution with your dancers' training will be the most beneficial approach in the long run.

Keep reading... Show less

Get Dance Business Weekly in your inbox

Sign Up Used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.