Teaching Tips

3 Tips for Staying Organized That All Dance Teachers Will Love

Let's be honest here, people. Dance teachers aren't necessarily known for having stellar organization skills. Don't get us wrong—you're super people who rule the world, but some details can get a little lost or muddy when you're drowning in classes, competitions, costumes and dance moms.

We thought we'd help you out with three tips for staying organized that are sure to free up the clutter and save your life this year.

YOU'RE WELCOME.


1. Keep a planner

Say it with me, people: PLANNER!!!!!!

Whether you prefer an online calendar or a paper planner, you need a place to write down your schedule and obligations. Write down every private lesson, extra rehearsal and competition. Once you have your deadlines and main events in place, you can schedule in any preparation you need to do for said event. For example, if you have a competition in a month, you can schedule time to make sequin changes to costumes, or add an extra rehearsal to clean up that one messy formation. If you plan ahead, you will have much less last-minute stress and feel confident about what you can and cannot take on each month.


2. Set alerts for yourself

Sometimes you'll forget to check your calendar to see what's happening, and totally forget to do that VERY important thing you were supposed to do. To avoid the drama, set alerts in your phone for a half hour before you have something important to do, so you won't forget to do it. Trust us, this one is a life-saver.


3. Color coordinate your calendar/e-mail inbox

We know that dance teachers aren't just dance teachers. You each have a million different things going on in and outside of the studio that can get hard to manage. To help, we recommend you color coordinate elements of your life, whether in your calendar or e-mail. For example, you could make private lessons red, regular class schedules blue, parent obligations pink, staff meetings orange, free time purple, etc. Visualizing it all in color can help you compartmentalize and attack tasks with more peace of mind. (For color coordinating fierceness, look to Mark Kanemura for advice 😘. )

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