Science has proven again, again that dancing is just, well, good for you. And not even in moderation. Like drinking water or laughing, there's no such thing as too much dancing. So, let's rejoice for this new dance perk to add to the list.


A new study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience revealed that the best exercise for slowing down the aging process is dancing. The researchers studied 52 healthy elderly volunteers from ages 63 to 80, who were assigned to either a dance group or a controlled sport group. Both groups proved exercise activates the brain, but of the types of workouts compared­-dancing, endurance, strength-endurance and flexibility training-dancing was the most effective for reversing aging in the brain. Woot woot!

Dancing proved to lead to "noticeable behavioral changes in terms of improved balance," says Dr. Kathrin Rehfeld, the study's lead author. The other major difference is learning dance routines and having to remember choreography adds an extra challenge for improving memory and is superior to repetitive exercise like walking or cycling.

So next time you're teaching complicated choreography, remind your students that they're building brain power. Dance on!

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