Dance News

Celebrate Black History Month by Remembering These Trailblazing Black Dancers

In honor of Black History Month, here are some of the most influential and inspiring black dancers who paved the way for future generations.

Born in Trinidad, Pearl Eileen Primus Made Her Mark as a Dancer in New York

Primus received many honors, including an honorary doctorate from Spelman College, the Distinguished Service Award from the Association of American Anthropologists and the National Medal of Arts.

Photo courtesy of Dance Magazine archives

Pearl Eileen Primus (1919–1994) was an ambassador of African dance and the African experience in the Caribbean and United States. Her Trinidadian heritage, combined with extensive studies in the Caribbean, Africa and the American South, became the lens through which she taught and choreographed. Confronting stereotypes and prejudice through movement, she advocated dance as a means of uniting people against discrimination. "When I dance, I am dancing as a human being, but a human being who has African roots," she declared of her work.

Primus was a force of unparalleled energy and drive, who challenged societal norms with masterful work that honored her ancestors and enlightened generations to come. "I dance not to entertain, but to help people better understand each other . . . because through dance I have experienced the wordless joy of freedom," she said of her life's work. "I see it more fully now for my people and for all people everywhere."

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